CNW: Clearford Water Systems Inc. Acquires 90% of UV Pure Technologies Inc.

Via: CanadaNewswire  OTTAWA, Dec. 22, 2014 /CNW

Clearford Water Systems Inc. (“Clearford” or the “Company”), (TSX-V: CLI), today announced the closing of the acquisition of a 90.7% interest in UV Pure Technologies Inc. (“UV Pure”). UV Pure is a Toronto-based manufacturer and distributor of ultraviolet systems for the purification of potable water, grey water and wastewater, based on its proprietary Crossfire™ technology, with over 14,000 systems installed. UV Pure has averaged approximately 10% annual revenue growth with positive operating earnings in each of the past 5 years. Operating earnings for the fiscal year ended May 31st, 2014, were $374,000 on revenues of $2.9 million (determined using Canadian Accounting Standards for Private Enterprises). Following the completion of the acquisition UV Pure will have no debt.

Clearford will acquire 90.7% of all of the outstanding shares of UV Pure for a cash payment of $2.6 million, subject to adjustments at closing. UV Pure’s management team will retain the remaining shares of UV Pure. UV Pure will operate as a corporate subsidiary of Clearford, under the leadership of its President and CEO, Richard (Rick) Vansant. The transaction closed late on December 19th, 2014 and is effective October 31st, 2014.

The market for ultraviolet purification of water and wastewater is estimated to be worth over $1 billion annually, with growth forecasted at 14% annually by independent market research firms. UV Pure’s product line is based on its proprietary Crossfire™ technology that is a generational step ahead of the technology used by competitors. The product line is lower in capital and operating cost per unit of water flow, easier to install, and both easier and cheaper to maintain. Hard water is a challenge for other UV systems and can be purified efficiently and effectively with UV Pure’s Crossfire™ technology. Further details can be found on http://www.uvpure.com.

Clearford is currently the distributor of UV Pure’s products in Colombia, and sees the acquisition as a strategic addition to ClearRecover™, the final step in the Company’s Clearford One™ wastewater collection and treatment system to deliver clean and pure water.

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Oceanside Star: Water out of thin air

Via: Water out of thin air / Oceanside Star, January 23, 2014

A Vancouver company wants people to consider getting cheap, potable water from a widely available source: air.

Splash Water For Life has created two atmospheric water generators: one for industrial use and one for home use.

The residential water generator looks like your typical water cooler, except there is no big blue bottle on top and it’s not connected to the building’s water supply.

“The air goes into an air filter at the bottom of the machine and the water gets sucked out of it [through condensation],” the company’s Elliot Mashford told a group of curious residents at Errington Hall on Monday. “Water then gets pumped through five filters, including UV filtration.”

Air quality has no effect on the generated water quality, thanks to the many filters.

Mashford and Splash Water’s Karson Hutchinson were in Errington at the invitation of Arrowsmith Water Management owner Larry Crawford, who said he was blown away by the technology.

“It’s going to be very important technology,” he said.

Mashford and Hutchinson call it “disruptive technology” because it can stop people from relying on bottled water.

The residential water generator can produce up to eight gallons of water per day. The water is recirculated throughout the day to keep it fresh.

The generator runs on both electricity and diesel fuel at a cost of between 3-8 cents per gallon.

The industrial model can produce up to 11,365 litres of water per day.

Splash Water For Life executive vice-president and inventor Phil Fraser came up with the idea during a board meeting a decade ago.

“He saw somebody dump the water from a dehumidifier in the room and thought there should be a way to use that water,” Hutchinson said.

Fraser raised $5 million in financing over 10 years while he worked on successive models. After putting together the 18th model he felt confident enough to go to market.

The residential model is priced at about $1,000, while the industrial model’s price varies according to specifications. The filters need to be changed every year or so at a cost of less than $200.

The only catch is the water generator can only be used in regions where the relative humidity is between 40 per cent and 100 per cent.

“Eighty per cent of the world’s population lives in regions where the machine could work all year,” Mashford said.

On Vancouver Island, he said, the relative humidity rarely drops below 80 per cent.

The machine’s only byproducts are warm and cool air, which can be used to regulate the temperature of a room.

“At our North Vancouver showroom, we used it to control the temperature in our showroom,” Mashford said.

Atmospheric water harvesting has next to no effect on the environment, he said. If every home on Earth used the water generator, it would cause only an estimated 0.0002 per cent drop in water vapor levels in the atmosphere.

The company started selling the generators about 10 months ago. One of the machines is part of a permanent display at the Telus World of Science in Vancouver.

For more information, see http://www.splashwaterforlife.com.

G&M: Making the most of wastewater

via Globe and Mail

Monday, December 30, 2013

By Richard Blackwell

The warm water being flushed down Canada’s sewers could become a huge source of recycled energy.

Wastewater heat is already being put to use in a handful of buildings in British Columbia, where a small company called International Wastewater Systems is on the leading edge of the technology and hoping to turn it into a formidable business.

IWS’s system takes heat from the water going down the drain from sinks and toilets in a condo, and transfers it to the clean water coming into the building. It can dramatically cut water heating costs, and thus pay back the price of installation within a couple of years.

The system works because wastewater is consistently at about 20 to 25 degrees Celsius. With heat exchangers, that energy can be used to generate hot water at higher temperatures.

IWS founder and president Lynn Mueller, who trained as a refrigeration mechanic, said he was working with geothermal heating systems when he began considering all the warm water which was being flushed down the drain.

“I was thinking that every day I comfortably flush down water that it cost me $10 or $20 a day [to heat],” he said. “That is perfectly good heat.”

A 2005 U.S. Department of Energy study estimated that 350 billion kilowatt-hours of heat energy is flushed down the drains in the United States each year.

The key to Mr. Mueller’s system is the special filter his company designed, which temporarily removes the solids from the wastewater, leaving it just clean enough to pass through a heat pump without clogging the heat exchangers. The warmth from the wastewater is transferred to a flow of fresh water – without either stream of water coming in contact with each other. The solids are then combined back into the wastewater before it goes down the sewer.

The system also has software that monitors it at all times – “a brain that reports to us before any problem exists,” Mr. Mueller said.

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envirolaw: Will Environmental Tribunal Enforce Public Trust in Water?

Will Environmental Tribunal Enforce Public Trust In Water?
by Dianne Saxe, Saxe Law Office, May 22 2013

via mondaq.com

Ecojustice has intervened in an appeal before Ontario’s Environmental Review Tribunal, hoping that they will enforce a public trust in water resources.

Nestle Canada Inc. (“Nestle”) runs Ontario’s largest water bottling operation. They pump groundwater from two different sets of wells in the Guelph area. Each well requires a Permit to Take Water (“PTTW”) from the Ministry of Environment (“MOE”) in order to operate.

Nestle recently had the PTTW for one of their wells renewed by the Ministry. The renewed permit contains new conditions that require reduced water takings during periods of summer drought1. Nestle appealed these conditions to the Environmental Review Tribunal (“ERT”).

Ecojustice intervened in the appeal on behalf of public interest groups and/or local citizens with a long history of opposing Nestle’s bottled water operations in the area – the Wellington Water Watchers (“WWW”) and the Council of Canadians (“CoC”).

While the Ministry of the Environment is the main party defending the conditions, they have agreed to a settlement of the appeal. Ecojustice is asking the ERT to continue the hearing, in order to prevent any settlement agreement from weakening the anti-drought conditions. Ecojustice argues that the principles of the public trust doctrine (“PTD”) provide an additional basis for upholding the original conditions.

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Postmedia: Projects focus on water stewardship

via: Projects focus on water stewardship, CAPP, Postmedia, Feb. 28, 2013

When energy producer Encana was seeking water management strategies for its Two Island Lake hydraulic fracturing operations in British Columbia’s Horn River Basin, the primary goal was to have the least-possible impact on surface water.

“We were fortunate to identify the Debolt formation, a deep, non-potable aquifer containing saline water, unsuitable for human or agricultural use,” says Mike Forgo, Encana’s Vice-President of Business Services & Stakeholder Relations. “This type of formation is not available in many areas of B.C.”

The discovery led to a project with peer company Apache to design and build the Debolt Water Treatment Plant and develop the formation as a water source reservoir – the first of its kind in Canada.

It took a great deal of innovation and collaboration to tap this unique resource, but the effort brought a significant payoff. Some 98 per cent of water needed for both companies’ operations at Two Island Lake now comes from this saline source.

Combined with systems that allow for full recovery and re-use of fracturing fluids, the result is a development with minimal draw on surface water and a low environmental footprint.

The strategy that led to the Debolt find is helping to lower surface water use in other areas of the province. In the Montney play in northeastern B.C., Encana is currently developing a water-handling and distribution hub using subsurface water sources.

“We understand that unconventional resource development is water-intensive,” Mr. Forgo says. “Encana, and the oil and gas industry, is taking proactive steps to address concerns and produce in as responsible a manner as possible.”

THE TRUCK STOPS HERE

In keeping with its global objective, Shell Canada is constantly developing new technologies and processes to conserve water in all of its operations, and it is working with communities to address challenges and concerns.

When the company began operations west of Dawson Creek, B.C., the local community raised two issues: water use and truck traffic. Shell listened to the concerns of citizens and developed a water management strategy which focuses on recycling as well as a partnership with the City of Dawson Creek for a reclaimed water facility. This facility processes sewage waste water from the community that was formerly released into Dawson Creek.

A 48-kilometre pipeline from the plant transports the treated water to Shell’s operations in the Groundbirch gas field, where it is combined with recycled production water and used in the hydraulic fracturing process. The result is the virtual elimination of the use of surface water.

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The Polis Project: Four big trends emerging in global water governance

 

Global water governance trends show move away from private ownership

Jeremy Osborn for The Guardian, Monday 10 December 2012

 

Flooding Old Malton pub

More crises, such as the recent floods in the UK, are one of four big trends emerging in global water governance today says the Polis Water Project. Photograph: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Throughout history, the most successful civilisations have been those that have managed their water well. These “hydraulic societies” span the cradle of civilisation in Mesopotamia through to modernity. The success of modern civilisation is, in many key ways, dependant on our ability to become a global version of the hydraulic society.

But what does an emerging global hydraulic society look like?

Broadly, it means a move away from private ownership, and towards more innovative forms of collaborative governance and resource sharing, but Oliver M Brandes of the Polis Water Project says there are four big trends emerging in global water governance today:

More hands on the steering wheel: around the world, water management is an increasingly localised process, with decision-making happening between a broad variety of public and private stakeholders at the local watershed level. This puts business in direct negotiation not only with governments, but with a wide range of public stakeholders.

More rights for nature: more jurisdictions are using policy to safeguard large portions of their water supply for natural processes. This will continue to create a form of conscious scarcity, where the ability of industry to leave zero or net positive operational impact on water supplies will be critical to maintaining social license to operate.

More water in public trust: increasingly, water cannot be owned, even by governments. Courts in many jurisdictions are citing centuries of common law, which show water as a common asset. This is ending the era of unbounded decision-making on water rights by individual interests, including government. Global water governance is moving towards multi-party, consensus driven decision-making processes, where business is a single voice among many, and where access to, not ownership of, water resources, is becoming the new normal.

More crises: governance changes tend to come rapidly and unexpectedly in response to crises –such as the Australian drought or the UK’s flooding. This can be challenging for companies, because crises are hard to predict, and also because climate change is significantly increasing the number of crises that occur each year. Because of this, companies need to be positioned in advance for rapid and unexpected changes in governance and regulatory practices.

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Water Canada: Water Quality Forecasting for Better Infrastructure Spending

Via: Water Canada, Posted on October 1, 2012
Written by Greg Rose and Tim Webster

Water resource conflicts are becoming increasingly prevalent as the intensity of competing uses of nearshore environments increases. Given the complexity of environmental systems, successfully managing and cost-effectively addressing these conflicts can be challenging. To address such challenges, a five-partner collaboration, comprising Golder Associates, Esri Canada, the Applied Geomatics Research Group, Scotia Weather Services and GeoNet, is developing and testing a water quality forecasting and infrastructure optimization system piloted in Nova Scotia’s Annapolis Basin.

Funded by the Atlantic Innovation Fund of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, the research project leverages geospatial technology for advanced mapping and analysis of various factors affecting water quality. When completed, the system will allow municipalities in the basin to focus their infrastructure investment strategies to maximize environmental returns and allow shellfish harvesting to be planned in a way that maximizes existing resources.

The issue

Shellfish harvesting is a key part of the economy of the Annapolis Basin, an arm of the Bay of Fundy in eastern Canada. For the region’s famed Digby clams and other seafood to be marketable, the water from which they are harvested must be sufficiently clean. This can be a challenge given the area’s proximity to sources of potential contamination, such as municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), watershed runoff, and concentrated deposits of fecal matter from seabirds and seals, as well as high tidal flows that can carry contaminants far from the source and render the harvest from some of the basin’s shellfish growing areas (SGAs) temporarily unsafe.

While current legislative controls in Canada, administered via the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program (CSSP), provide the necessary checks and balances for protecting human health, their application is relatively labour intensive and expensive. Understandably, the current protocols are geared to exercising precaution. This often leads to closures of growing areas, in cases where these have the potential to yield high-quality harvests under optimal environmental conditions. Conversely, where shellfish harvested from non-prohibited areas are identified as contaminated during the testing process, the harvest is inevitably worthless unless it can be purified cost-effectively.

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